Category World War 1

The war moved on as the USA took a hand

The United States had carefully kept out of the conflict in Europe while being helpful to the sufferers.  In 1917 the British intercepted and decoded a telegram from the German Foreign Secretary Arthur Zimmermann to Mexico urging that country to enter into war against the United States. The American states of Texas, Arizona and New […]

The world was changing – and perhaps not for the better

It’s the second decade of the 20th century and the world continues to develop and change. At this time Great Britain was at the centre of the world’s largest empire, a beneficiary of colonial resources and trade.  It occupied territory on four different continents and was at the centre of a vast trading and commercial […]

It happened on April 9th

I find it fascinating when a particular date has links to differing actual events.  The 9th April is one such date: Sunday 9th April 1865 was the day that the American Civil War finally ended when the Confederate General Robert E Lee surrendered to General Ulysses S Grant at the Appomattox Court House in Virginia. […]

The death of a great Prime Minister

Three days ago I was telling the story of the 1st World War and the Prime Minister of the time.  Today we tell the story of another World War Prime Minister – Sir Winston Churchill –and his involvement in the first one and his control – and perhaps saving – the second one and his […]

Single men are required for the conflict.

It was on Thursday 27th January 1916 that Britain’s parliament passed the Military Service Act – an Act that introduced compulsory conscription for all single men between the ages of 18 and 41. The Great War was edging into its third year of conflict when British Prime Minister Herbert Asquith introduced the first military conscription […]

The story of a star begins

It was on the first day of this year – 1st January 2018 – that I wrote that it was on Friday 27th December 1901 in Schoneberg, a suburb of Berlin, that one Marie Magdalene Dietrich was born – the product of a privileged and conservative family – and a fact that she seemingly failed […]

In Flanders Fields

John McCrae is remembered for what is probably the best known and most popular of all First World War poetry.  It is believed that he was so moved by the death of his friend Lieutenant Alexis Helmet, who had been killed by a shell burst, and inspired by the profusion of wild poppies he could […]