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We’ll soon be back in action

My last posting was 30th July – since then NOTHING! All things being equal we should be back in action from this Thursday! Brian

Gentlemen play Players at Lords

Thursday 27th July 1950 was the middle day of the Gentlemen vs Players cricket match being played at Lord’s and this day’s Hull Daily Mail headlined: ‘Brown shows all-round ability’ F R Brown who hit a hurricane 100 for Gentlemen against Players at Lord’s yesterday – and established himself as England’s likely captain for Australia […]

Do you ever over educate?

It was on Wednesday 24th July 1765 that Denis Diderot – a French philosopher, art critic and writer – wrote: “Do not over-educate is a maxim particularly suited to boys. You should abandon them a little to their natural impulses. I prefer them to be rough, thoughtless, and wilful. Let them have the sort of […]

John Clare comes home

John Clare – the Helpston poet – appears to have had little direct involvement with the nearby Peterborough apart from a brief time with the Militia at Norman Cross. However, he does make passage through Peterborough on this day Friday 23rd July 1841. In 1837 he had been admitted to the High Beach Asylum in […]

The story of King Henry’s Mary Rose

Sunday 19th July 1545 was the day that the Mary Rose, flagship of King Henry VIII’s fleet, sank off Portsmouth 34 years after coming into service.  The wreck was located in 1971, raised and is now a museum that attracts visitors from across the world. The reason why she sank, however, remains a matter for […]

‘Windsor’ becomes a Royal name

It was on Tuesday 17th July 1917 that the British Royal Family formally adopted the name ‘Windsor’ in the place of ‘Saxe-Coburg-Gotha’. ‘The Cornishman’ newspaper carried a typical statement of the facts with the heading: THE HOUSE OF WINDSOR – RENUNCIATION OF SAXE-COBURG. ‘A Proclamation was signed at the Privy Council at Buckingham Palace on […]

England’s Dockers go on strike

It was on Thursday 16th July 1970 that the first national dock strike in Britain since 1926 began.  In total it involved around 47,000 dockworkers across the country. Seeking to raise their basic wage from £11 a week, British Dockers’ representatives had voted 48 to 32 in favour of strike action the previous day. As […]