Category 19th century

London’s Evening Standard of Saturday 19th October 1861 tells us:

The more I look at newspapers of the past, the more fascinating I find them. Take, for instance, page 5 of this Saturday’s London Evening Standard (some wording has been altered to make modern sense): Column 1 – This day’s Police report comes from Marlborough Street and reports a SALE-ROOM ROBBERY: Thomas John Jackson, an […]

It’s paper as we know it but …….

Ralph Wedgwood (1766–1837) was an English inventor and member of the Wedgwood family of potters – a member that is rarely mentioned in any situation.  He was born in Burslem, Staffordshire, the eldest son of Thomas Wedgwood and his wife Elizabeth and the cousin – and later business partner – of Josiah Wedgwood.   Funding £200 […]

The story of William Bligh

William Bligh was born on this day, Monday 9th September 1754.  As a sea captain he is  invariably considered to be a tyrannical and cruel bully who brought a ships mutiny down on himself. But is that really true? There is a very good case for saying that that persona is not true and it […]

Matthew Boulton enters the world – and leaves it all the better 80 years later.

Matthew Boulton was born on Monday 3rd September 1728 in Birmingham and died just short of his 81st birthday on Thursday 17th August 1809 in that same city.  In between these two events he made a tremendous impact on the life of his time – an impact that remains to this day. After managing his […]

A story of times gone by

Britain has many ‘traditional’ activities that, in summer or harvest time, bring all members of the community together for a celebration – a celebration that can go on for the best part of a week or more.  The town where I now live had a reputation for their ‘Feast’ but, I’m afraid, those events seem […]

John Clare comes home

John Clare – the Helpston poet – appears to have had little direct involvement with the nearby Peterborough apart from a brief time with the Militia at Norman Cross. However, he does make passage through Peterborough on this day Friday 23rd July 1841. In 1837 he had been admitted to the High Beach Asylum in […]

Will this stop people fixing the vote?

It was on Thursday 18th July 1872 that the Royal Assent was given to the ‘Parliamentary and Municipal Elections (Ballot) Bill’. Put simply – from now on each individual vote would be cast in secret. This was a fundamental change to an age old process. No longer would those entitled to vote have to identify […]