Category 19th century conflict

He was here with Admiral Nelson

The signal sent from Admiral Nelson’s flagship HMS Victory before the Battle of Trafalgar on Monday 21st October 1805 was simply ‘England expects that every man will do his duty’. The story of the battle has been so well told and published that I’m not going to follow the typical route.  I’m going to briefly […]

London’s Evening Standard of Saturday 19th October 1861 tells us:

The more I look at newspapers of the past, the more fascinating I find them. Take, for instance, page 5 of this Saturday’s London Evening Standard (some wording has been altered to make modern sense): Column 1 – This day’s Police report comes from Marlborough Street and reports a SALE-ROOM ROBBERY: Thomas John Jackson, an […]

The Victoria Cross and two brave and special Wednesdays

The Victoria Cross was introduced in Great Britain on Saturday 29th January 1856 by Queen Victoria. Its ‘role’ was to reward acts of valour during the Crimean War. The VC takes precedence over all other Orders, Decorations and Medals and may be awarded to a person of any rank in any service and to civilians […]

The story of William Bligh

William Bligh was born on this day, Monday 9th September 1754.  As a sea captain he is  invariably considered to be a tyrannical and cruel bully who brought a ships mutiny down on himself. But is that really true? There is a very good case for saying that that persona is not true and it […]