War in England & Golf in America – two countries soon to be ‘playing together

 

On this day – Thursday 29th August 1940 – the Daily Sketch headlined: NAZIS RAID LONDON – AND 13 TOWNS.  The sub-headings said that ‘Mr. Churchill Sees Coast Battles’.  However, it was the ‘INSIDE INFORMATION’ piece that caught my eye.  The following are just three pieces from that information:

Many complaints are being made to the Minister of Home Security about the profiteering in the construction of brick-and-concrete bomb shelters.  Questions are to be asked when Parliament reassembles.

Anderson shelters are no longer obtainable.  Certain builders are taking advantage of this.  They are demanding – take it or leave it – from £30 to £50 for small family shelters which could be built at a profit of £20.

Frau Goebbels is becoming regal-minded.  She is going to Versailles to spend two weeks’ holiday at the Royal Palace.  A suite of rooms where once the King of France lived is being prepared for her.

 

The Sketch is not all like this though.  On page 10 we find:

‘The Caddie’s Nightmare’

It reads:  The caddie who carries the world’s heaviest golf bag is to get a rest.  Densmore Shute, American Ryder Cup golfer, has been rushed to hospital with appendicitis.

Denny’s bag was for long a caddies’ nightmare.  The heavyweight affair he had for the unofficial World Championship match with Henry Cotton at Walton Heath (UK) three years back was a fearful and wonderful thing.

It contained 20 clubs (6 woods & 14 irons), loads of golf balls, woollies, an outsize umbrella and golf shoes, and the victim, who I think used to carry the late Lord Lurgan’s clubs, estimated the weight at 50lb.

With the coming of the fourteen-club rule, Shute’s bag lost some corpulence, but I don’t think it’s true that his home caddy still offers to carry for both players when Shute goes out for a round.

Sir Thomas Henry Cotton, MBE (28 January 1907 – 22 December 1987) was an English professional golfer who won the British Open Championships in 1934, 1937 and 1948, becoming the leading British player of his generation

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